Professional License Lawyer in North Carolina

Navigating Continuing Education: Tips for Maintaining Your Professional License

Navigating Continuing Education: Tips for Maintaining Your Professional License

Today’s topic is navigating continuing education tips for maintaining your professional license. Each licensed professional will have continuing education requirements. This means that there will be courses offered by designated entities. Some of these courses could be associated with whatever board or agency that you are licensed under, or they could be from a third party approved by the board or agency for continuing education credits.
Where that continuing education is, there will be advanced lessons specialized for your particular licensed profession. For example, attorneys have continuing legal education, which means there will be other attorneys or people in related fields, such as malpractice insurance companies, who will conduct these courses. Attorneys are required to complete a certain number of hours done every year, or, as of 2024, every other year on a two-year rolling requirement.
Taking attorneys as an example a little further, if we have another attorney conducting an ethics hour, they will go into detail on updates to ethics rules. They may also discuss some hot-button issues related to ethics, with trust accounting usually being one of them. For a general contractor, there will be hot-button issues addressed in continuing education courses geared towards general contractors, and so on and so forth.
The three main things are: make sure that you know how many hours you need to complete, including any special hours required, such as an ethics hour or a substance abuse hour. Ensure you know the total number of hours you need and the time frame in which you need to complete them, whether it be a 12-month period, 24-month period, or otherwise. The most important thing is twofold. First, when you sign up for the CEs (Continuing Education), ensure the organization is properly vetted and approved by your licensing entity to offer continuing education courses. This ensures that the courses will count towards your overall requirement because there is nothing worse than paying a significant amount of money for courses that do not count. Make sure that the people providing the continuing education are authorized by your licensing entity and that the credits you earn will be accepted by your licensing entity.
*Nothing in this blog establishes an attorney-client relationship. Nothing in this blog is legal advice. If you have any questions, please check out our other blogs and our Youtube channel. You can also call us at 919-521-8810 with questions.