Professional License Lawyer in North Carolina

What Type of Impact Is There If Someone Is Untruthful on a Professional License Application?

What Type of Impact Is There If Someone Is Untruthful on a Professional License Application?

Today, I want to talk about dishonesty in regards to filling out an application for a professional license and/or being dishonest on a renewal application. So, both of these are terrible ideas. You do not want to be dishonest on there. You want to be a hundred percent forthright. I always say, err on the side of caution. If you’re not a hundred percent sure if you should answer “yes” or “no” on disclosing something to a licensing entity, typically people have questions about, “Hey, it is not clear whether I should disclose this part of criminal record or this part or that.” If you’re not sure, then you could do a couple of things. You can anonymously reach out to the Board, or you could err on the side of caution and click like, “Yes, I have X, Y, or Z,” and answer your affirm with that. And then that way they’re not going to be able to look back on it and go, “Well, you weren’t a hundred percent honest with this. We meant this.”
So again, you want to err on the side of caution there, and it could become an issue where they institute an investigation against you, and you go down that route. And then maybe at the end of the day, they look at the investigation and they said, “Well, we didn’t really mean it that way, but thank you for being upfront with this.” So, you don’t want the flip side where you guess and you say, “Oh, there’s no way that they meant my conviction five years ago. I should disclose that.” And then you click “no”. And they do a background check, which is typically going to be part for the course for a lot of licensing entities and say, “Oh, well, what about this possession of stolen goods that you had five years ago that you were convicted for back then? Why didn’t you disclose that on your licensing application?” or, “Hey, you have a renewal application coming up and you got a DUI (Driving While Intoxicated) or something, or DWI (Driving Under the Influence) or something like that. You’re able to get it resolved. It takes, maybe you had your attorney, and you get everything resolved within nine months or six months or something like that. And you go to renew it and on the renewal application it’ll say, “Have you ever been arrested or convicted within the last 12 months?” And you click “no” on that and knowing full well you were arrested for the DWI and you pled guilty in some capacity, or you did some sort of plea with it and got it disposed and you click “no”, well, you’ve obviously lied on the renewal application. That’s going to be a problem with the Board. And they really don’t care what Board or state agency, they have a real problem with dishonesty in the professions, which I completely understand.
So you want to be very careful when you are doing the initial application for licensure with a state agency or licensing Board. You want to make sure that you’re truthful and err on the side of caution when you’re redoing your renewal application. We’re all professionals. We all get busy. When you’re doing something important, especially like that, you need to slow down and read it very carefully because saying, “Oh, I’m sorry. I rushed and clicked “no” when I should have clicked “yes”,” they might not believe you and it doesn’t really speak well to you to say, “Hey, I made a mistake on this very important document that had to do with my livelihood.” And they are going to look upon that very unfavorably as well. So you want to be very careful. Obviously, you never, ever want to intentionally be dishonest. You don’t want to unintentionally be dishonest, as I mentioned and say, “Oops, I rushed.” So you just have to be very careful when you fill out these applications and renewal applications because you’re talking about your livelihood. When you’re dealing with something like a licensing entity, they’re really going to scrutinize statements made by you on their forms. You want to err on the side of caution and you want to make sure that you answer accurately. So again, slow down when you’re filling out those forms so you can do it correctly.

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